Child Custody FAQ

At Weinman & Associates, P.C. in Austin, we are committed to giving you the knowledge you need to make informed decisions. For that reason, we have provided answers to some of the most common questions about child custody. For more information, you can contact us at any time to discuss your case with a lawyer who can answer your questions.

How Is Child Custody Determined?

The driving force in every Texas child custody case is the best interests of the child. The needs of the parents are not the primary concern, by any means. Of course, everyone will have a different opinion about what is truly in the child's best interest. The current relationship between each parent and the child will play an important role. Who is currently helping the child with homework, going to after-school activities and spending time with the child? Is it equal?

At our law firm, we recommend that parents work together, through either negotiation or mediation, to reach agreements about child custody arrangements. Fights should be avoided, as they can be stressful for all involved. With more than 20 years of experience handling child custody cases, we know how to facilitate agreements that will protect your relationship with your child and serve your child's best interests.

Will I Get Joint Custody?

In Texas, joint custody is referred to as joint managing conservatorship (JMC). Frequently, because the courts believe that both parents should be equally involved in their child's lives, each parent will be made a joint managing conservator. A standard possession order (SPO) will then be created that outlines each parent's rights and responsibilities.

Are Child Custody Plans Permanent?

Care needs to be taken at the outset to make certain that child custody agreements make sense, because these agreements are binding. If one party violates the agreement, he or she may be subject to enforcement. However, the courts understand that life comes with change. The needs of children change and the situations of parents change. Modification of child custody orders is possible in the event of a change in circumstances.

What If One Of The Parents Wants To Move?

The parent with conservatorship or custody of the child cannot simply move to another city, state or country with the child without permission. Unfortunately, this happens occasionally, and it may become a case of interstate or international child abduction. These cases are serious and complex, and require the attention of an attorney well-versed in the Uniform Child Custody Jurisdiction and Enforcement Act (UCCJEA) and the Hague Convention. We have earned a reputation as the go-to law firm in Austin in these cases.

Whether a move-away has already occurred or you are considering or concerned about a potential relocation, we can offer you the guidance you need.

Do Child Custody Arrangements Impact Child Support?

Yes, in most cases, the noncustodial parent will be required to make child support payments to the custodial parent. The amount will depend on the specifics of the parenting arrangements.

More Questions?

Want to know more about how child custody and visitation work in Texas? Call 512-472-4040 or send us an email.

At Weinman & Associates, P.C. in Austin, we are committed to giving you the knowledge you need to make informed decisions. For that reason, we have provided answers to some of the most common questions about child custody. For more information, you can contact us at any time to discuss your case with a lawyer who can answer your questions.

How Is Child Custody Determined?

The driving force in every Texas child custody case is the best interests of the child. The needs of the parents are not the primary concern, by any means. Of course, everyone will have a different opinion about what is truly in the child's best interest. The current relationship between each parent and the child will play an important role. Who is currently helping the child with homework, going to after-school activities and spending time with the child? Is it equal?

At our law firm, we recommend that parents work together, through either negotiation or mediation, to reach agreements about child custody arrangements. Fights should be avoided, as they can be stressful for all involved. With more than 20 years of experience handling child custody cases, we know how to facilitate agreements that will protect your relationship with your child and serve your child's best interests.

Will I Get Joint Custody?

In Texas, joint custody is referred to as joint managing conservatorship (JMC). Frequently, because the courts believe that both parents should be equally involved in their child's lives, each parent will be made a joint managing conservator. A standard possession order (SPO) will then be created that outlines each parent's rights and responsibilities.

Are Child Custody Plans Permanent?

Care needs to be taken at the outset to make certain that child custody agreements make sense, because these agreements are binding. If one party violates the agreement, he or she may be subject to enforcement. However, the courts understand that life comes with change. The needs of children change and the situations of parents change. Modification of child custody orders is possible in the event of a change in circumstances.

What If One Of The Parents Wants To Move?

The parent with conservatorship or custody of the child cannot simply move to another city, state or country with the child without permission. Unfortunately, this happens occasionally, and it may become a case of interstate or international child abduction. These cases are serious and complex, and require the attention of an attorney well-versed in the Uniform Child Custody Jurisdiction and Enforcement Act (UCCJEA) and the Hague Convention. We have earned a reputation as the go-to law firm in Austin in these cases.

Whether a move-away has already occurred or you are considering or concerned about a potential relocation, we can offer you the guidance you need.

Do Child Custody Arrangements Impact Child Support?

Yes, in most cases, the noncustodial parent will be required to make child support payments to the custodial parent. The amount will depend on the specifics of the parenting arrangements.

More Questions?

Want to know more about how child custody and visitation work in Texas? Call 512-472-4040 or send us an email.