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Child Custody Archives

Can grandparents pursue custody of a child in Texas?

A typical custody battle involves two parents fighting over how to divide their child's time and where to raise the child. However, in many cases, the parents are simply not the best option for meeting the child's needs. Instead, it is sometimes wise for grandparents to step up to the plate and seek legal custody of the child. In Texas, grandparents may seek custody, but only if the circumstances and the grandparents themselves meet a number of qualifications.

The child’s best interests often decide custody disputes

When approaching divorce as a parent, it is not always easy to balance your own needs and priorities with those of your child. This is perfectly understandable, but does not work in your favor when it comes time for a court to approve a custody agreement or issue a custody order. As far courts are concerned, the best interests of the child must dictate the distribution of custody privileges and responsibilities.

Modifying your custody order after divorce

Once your divorce finalizes and you and your child's other parent begin working through the process of actually raising your child separately, you may find that your custody arrangement simply doesn't work with your needs or circumstances. In some cases, this is due to poor foresight while crafting your custody agreement, whereas in other cases, a parent's income or health may change significantly, making it infeasible to abide by the existing arrangement .

Creating a fair custody plan with your child’s other parent

Parents who divorce face a number of very difficult choices, chief among them the choice between working together to create a parenting plan that meets their child's needs or forfeiting that responsibility to the court. To hear many divorcees discuss the process, one might think that a court steps in and harshly decides how parents raise their children, but in most cases this does not occur.

Child custody and parental relocation

When parents who live together choose to divorce or split up, one parent often moves out of the family home to a separate dwelling. While this is certainly a practical choice in most cases, it may seriously impact future custody decisions. If you recently moved out of the home where your child lives with his or her other parent, or if you are weighing it as an option, be sure to consider how this may affect your custody negotiations.

Virtual visitation for parents

These days, parents have a few more options than previous generations when it comes to custody and visitation, including virtual visitation. Virtual visitation is still relatively new and is not prescribed in every instance, but many courts now recognize that the widespread use of smartphones and tablets allows parents and children to spend time together through videoconferencing technology.

Domestic violence and child custody decisions

When you and your child's other parent share custody, you may have reasons to believe that your co-parent acts violently toward your child during their time together. Whether this is because of physical evidence, seeing the violence take place, or hearing about it from your child, it is obviously of the utmost importance that you keep your child safe. However, if your child's other parent enjoys court-ordered time with the child, you may feel as though you have few options to maintain your child's safety and still abide by the terms of the custody order.

What is a fixed visitation schedule in child custody?

When a couple must work out how to share child custody and visitation privileges, courts prefer to give them the opportunity to create a plan they both can agree upon, provided that it places the best interests of their child above their own rights or privileges. Unfortunately, parents are not always to reach such an agreement, and the court must step in and create a more rigid schedule that both parents must legally follow or risk loss of privileges or even criminal charges.

Are you a victim of parenting time interference?

As a parent sharing custody or visitation rights, you know that custody issues are often very difficult to navigate. It is normal for parents to face some difficulty forming their lives around a court ordered custody plan, but some behavior crosses a line into dangerous territory, amounting in some cases to parenting time interference.

Best interests of a child and grandparent custody

When a court considers custody options for a child, it is primarily concerned with the child's best interests above the rights or many of the preferences of parents and other guardians. In many cases, a court may even consider the wishes of the child in a ruling. This does not mean that parents and others in the child's life have no say in the custody of a child: in fact, quite the opposite. Most courts prefer for families to work together to create a custody plan that puts the child's needs first.

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